EDWISE  - EDITOR AND EDUCATION CONSULTANT
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A Year of Living Positively -Day 159

I got the first mosquito bites of the season this evening. Having left the door to the apartment open when I got home, I had forgotten about it until something fluttered close to my eye. I had already started scratching my thumb and the outer corner of my eye, unaware that the pests could be biting by now.
 
It’s the females that do it, though they are small. The males have been out and in circulation for over a month, some of them as big as airplanes yet harmless. It’s typical that the first hatching of females occurs in mid-June. I guess they’re out early because of the spring weather has been wetter than normal, though this spring has also been cooler than normal.
 
I just watched a powerful independent movie about the crimes and suffering in the residential schools in what is now the US and Canada. It was a production of a story set in Cree territory. It links the role of the parish priest in committing atrocities and covering them up through the twentieth century to present times. Well, the movie was released in 2008. It features Bradley Cooper as a researcher, though his role is a minor one. I believe he participated in that film around the time he was already getting to be well-known and successful. Good for him. It was very correct and commendable of him to play a part and lend a hand with this kind of education. There are a couple of well known Aboriginal actors in this film: Tantou Cardinal, whom I believe is Metis from the Canadian side of the border, and a guy whose name I never recall though his face is famous—he was in the Last of Mohicans, and has been a bad guy in other big feature commercial films. Anyway, a very impressive film employing ghosts and intrigue. As the plot goes, authorities of  a community try to hush up the daughter of a woman who was labeled schizophrenic for telling stories about a residential school and forced to undergo electric shock treatments in order to shut her up, is herself basically kidnapped and taken to the same psychiatric hospital to receive similar “therapy” because she is starting to learn the truth. A local priest has been requesting and overseeing this kind of dirty work for decades, using his influence over anti-Indian city officials and medical staff. In the end, the woman escapes, the truth comes out, the guilty local authorities put to shame, families are reunited, and the process of forgiveness and rebuilding begins. It is a well told story that avoids stereotypes and political rants, but strongly asserts the facts of history.
 
I began tackling the tasks of the day by getting through to the airlines and ticketing agents that have been handling my plan reservations and itinerary so that I could see about changing the departure date. With the elections happening on June 4 and the employer having confirmed it is to be a holiday from work, I have an extra free day. The ticket is changed and I leave on the 4!
 
There was no extra charge to change the ticket this time because I spoke to the airlines directly. Orbitz would have charged me another $200! Lufthansa staff said there is never any additional charge when someone rebooks on the same flight with the same status, but a different day.
 
I just have to make a decision and take care of the transportation to and from the Incheon airport. I think it’ll be best to fly in order to make it in a timely fashion, and not overtax my strength for the voyage. I should see about the flight to Seoul tomorrow.

 

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